Lowell Observatory Pluto Telescope

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Lowell Observatory Telescope

My parents in front of the historical 13 inch Astrograph (a type of telescope employed exclusively to take pictures) used to discover Pluto in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh.

This was at Lowell Observatory, Mars Hill Campus, in Flagstaff, AZ, which was named as one of “The World’s Most Important Places” by Time Magazine in 2011 (pp 112). It was established in 1894. It was also here at Lowell Observatory that the rings around Uranus was discovered in 1977.

I purchased a discounted membership which entitles us for ‘free’ entry for the year; the membership also grants us free general admission to other science centers around the USA that participate in the Association of Science and Technology Centers Passport Program, ASTC. Killing two birds with one stone 🙂

It was an unforgettable amazing experience to see first hand the important astronomical instrument that was the reason we had a planet named after the god of the underworld in our Astronomy class in school growing up. In August 24, 2006 though, Pluto was voted out as a full-pledged planet and demoted to a ‘dwarf planet’ status (not a planet) by International Astronomical Union (IAU).

Lowell ObservatoryLowell Observatory

Where Pluto was discovered.
Lowell Observatory, AZ.
In one of “The World’s Most Important Places”.

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Born and raised in the Pearl of the Orient Seas, now living in the United States; she is a traveler, road tripper, outdoor camper, and field photographer.

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16 Comments

  1. Such an informative post. Thank you. My parents were born in Flagstaff and I have been there many times and didn’t know that it was close to such an important place. Science seems to have taken a back seat now days compared to the past so it is very important to point things like this out.

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